News

Sautéed Zucchini with Feta

zucchini feta

I could not write this post without mentioning the current situation here in Greece. Yes, we have been going through some tough times. The Greek people have been asked to basically choose between a rock and a hard place. For the past years here in Greece we have been hit by increased austerity measures: taxes increasing everyday, salaries and the minimum wages going down, people losing their jobs, less money going into healthcare, schools and so many other services. Read more »

LinkedInFacebook

The First Mediterranean Diet Roundtable in New York City

Spanish lunch

Last week I had the opportunity to participate in the first ever Mediterranean Diet Roundtable. It was an effort to discuss the importance but also the application of the Mediterranean Diet in different venues in the US.

The roundtable that took place in New York City, was not the typical symposium that focuses only on the scientific side, but rather a mix of professionals you do not ordinarily see together in an event like this. Chefs, foodservice directors and researchers gathered and presented their Mediterranean Diet perspectives as seen through their field of work. Read more »

LinkedInFacebook

Mediterranean Diet May Protect Women From Stroke

 

gemista1

While there is plenty of research that has linked the Mediterranean diet with reduced incidence of heart disease, there is not much in regard to stroke. A stroke happens when there is an interruption of blood flow to the brain. An ischemic stroke involves a blood clot that blocks blood vessel flow, whereas a hemorrhagic stroke happens when a blood vessel breaks. It is the fifth leading cause of death in people aged 15 to 59 years old and second cause of death in individuals over 60. So yes it is important that we protect ourselves from it-young and old. Read more »

LinkedInFacebook

One Yogurt a Day Can Protect from Diabetes

real greek yogurt

According to a new study by Harvard researchers, yogurt is associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95% of diabetes cases and appears often in individuals who are overweight and have an unhealthy lifestyle, in other words it can be prevented in many cases.

In this study, the researchers analyzed data from over 100,000 individuals and what they found was that yogurt reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas other forms of dairy such as milk did not. In fact they found that one serving of yogurt a day reduced the risk by 18%. Imagine, just by eating one yogurt. Read more »

LinkedInFacebook

10 Greek Food Ingredients to Add to Your Diet Now

greek food

The Mediterranean diet is back in the spotlight! This week we had new research published that once again confirms what hundreds of previous studies have shown: that the Mediterranean diet is good for you. In one study researchers have found that a Mediterranean style diet can protect kidney function, while a second study showed that it provides better blood sugar control in people with diabetes.

If you are not sure where to start, I have singled out 10 foods typically used in the Mediterranean-Greek diet that you should add to your diet now, along with some traditional and not so traditional ways of using them. These ingredients are all great sources of beneficial nutrients and will put you well on your way to adapting your current diet to a Mediterranean one. Read more »

LinkedInFacebook

What Greek Kids are Eating for Lunch and Why American School Lunches Should be More Greek

usda

When you look at this photo which is from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it makes you feel good. Truthfully, it looks healthy, fresh, good for you. It is titled: Fresh vegetable cups prepared for the National School Lunch Program at Washington-Lee High School in Arlington, Virginia.

There is only one problem. Read more »

LinkedInFacebook

Red Pepper Dip with Feta Cheese and Greek Yogurt

redpepper dip

A new study from English researchers published in the British Medical Journal Open, showed that people who consumed 5 or more servings of fruit and vegetables experienced a higher level of mental well-being. According to researchers, high mental well-being is more than the absence of symptoms or illness; it is a state in which people feel good and function well. Optimism, happiness, self-esteem, resilience and good relationships with others are all part of this state. Read more »

LinkedInFacebook

Men, Listen up! This is Your Super Food.

tomatoes

Obviously I believe that tomatoes are one of the best foods we have. In the Greek kitchen tomatoes transform even the most boring vegetable into a delicious meal. But even plain, good, in-season tomatoes are wonderful with a sprinkle of salt or with some cheese or with a drizzle of olive oil.

We know that they are a good source of vitamin C, have very few calories and also have an antioxidant called lycopene that appears to protect from prostate cancer.

And now a new British study showed that men who consume 10 servings of tomatoes a week had an 18% less chance of developing prostate cancer. Read more »

LinkedInFacebook

5 Ways You are Using Olive Oil Wrong

EVOO spoon
1.You use it for special occasions
You may have bought a nice bottle of extra virgin cold pressed olive oil once and save it for special occasions and that bottle is sitting there for months even for a year waiting to be used. Drizzling it on some heirloom tomatoes you found at the farmers market or just to dip in some bread when you had company over. But the reality is that you are doing a disservice to the olive oil and yourself. Olive oil is best used when fresh for two reasons: it tastes good and it retains its nutrients when it is fresh. Let’s not forge that olives are fruit and as with every fruit you prefer their juice fresh. After 3-6 months from the harvest date olive oil is no longer fresh. So next time you find a nice olive oil, make sure you use it. Read more »

LinkedInFacebook

Eating Out in Greece. 10 Ways to Eat Like a Local.

Eating out in Greece

Every country has it own rules and considerations when it comes to food and Greece is no different. Generally, when you visit another country it is good to eat as the locals do, to know what to expect and to gain as close as you can an authentic eating experience.

1. Don’t expect your waiter to be your friend. By this I do not mean that Greek waiters are not friendly, many of them are, but you will not get the typical American greeting “Hi my name is so and so and I’ll be your server for tonight, can I get you some margaritas to start out?” No you will not have any of that. If they are really busy, they’ll probably bring out the basics (bread, forks, knives, menu etc.), and expect you to quickly give them your order when they come back to your table. Read more »

LinkedInFacebook