Greek Onion Pie with Feta Cheese – Kremmithopita

October 15, 2014

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You know that delicious aroma that you get when you are sautéing or frying onions? Doesn’t it smell wonderful? Well this pie tastes like that! Only better.

As I’ve mentioned in the past, pites (pie for Greek) are a great vehicle to get a lot of vegetables in your diet, but it was also a way to make a meal out of nothing. Homemakers like my yiayia would make wonderful pies with just some dough and vegetables or wild greens they had in their garden.

Onions, normally are used as an ingredient to provide flavor, but never the main component. Here the onions play the main role.

Don’t let that worry you. The onions are cooked before so that they become soft and sweet and along with feta which provides additional flavor and substance and the egg which provides some protein and you have a complete meal.

Onions are a rich source of an important antioxidant, quercetin. Studies have shown that quercetin has several health benefits such as prevention ulcers, protect the heart and may even be able to increase bone density. Apart from the onion, you also have antioxidants from the olive oil and a moderate amount of carbs from the phyllo.

Greek Onion Pie with Feta Cheese – Kremmithopita

INGREDIENTS

  • 5 cups sliced mature onions (preferably red)
  • 2 ½ cups sliced spring onions
  • 8 ounces feta cheese
  • 2 Tablespoons anthotiro (or ricotta or other soft cheese)
  • 1 heaping tablespoon Greek yogurt
  • 3 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons dill
  • 3 tablespoons parsley
  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil for sautéing + ¼-⅓ cup for brushing the phyllo
  • 1 package phyllo dough (defrosted)
  • salt and pepper

DIRECTIONS
1. Preheat the oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit (180 degrees celsius).

2. Slice the onions.

3. Sauté first the mature onions in 3 tablespoons of olive oil for 2-3 minutes.

4. Add the spring onions and sauté for an additional 6-7 minutes until soft. Add the herbs and some salt and pepper. Mix well and remove from heat.

5. In a large bowl mash the feta, soft cheese and yogurt with a fork.

6. Whip the eggs and add to the cheese mixture.

7. Add the cooled onion mixture to the cheese mixture and blend well.

8. Take a pan (I used a 10 X 12 inch pan), brush with a bit of olive oil and spread the first phyllo sheet, brush the sheet with olive oil and layer another phyllo sheet and brush with olive oil, continue this so you have a total 6 sheets.

9. Spread the filling on top of the sheets.

10. Layer the rest of the sheets on top of the filling brushing each one with olive oil.

11. Score the pie in as many pieces you prefer ( I cut in 9 large ones).

12. Bake in the lower level of the oven for about 1 hour.

13. Remove from oven and let it cool.

This is best enjoyed at room temperature. These also freeze well.

Photo by Elena Paravantes

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15 Comments

  • Reply Cheryl October 15, 2014 at 10:18 am

    Yum. How much feta Elena?

    • Reply Elena Paravantes RD October 15, 2014 at 4:52 pm

      Thank you for noticing that Cheryl. I just edited it, it is about 8 ounces.

      • Reply Cheryl October 16, 2014 at 9:46 am

        Thankyou. It’s on the weekend’s list.

  • Reply Zuzanna October 16, 2014 at 8:00 am

    Looks delicious! I like sauted onions a lot!
    I am planning to make pites with pumpkin and spinach. Can you tell me if Greeks ever use pumpkin to make pites?

    • Reply Helen Robles October 16, 2014 at 11:43 pm

      Are you familiar with the Cephelonian lamb pita with rice?

      • Reply Elena Paravantes RD October 27, 2014 at 8:55 am

        I am familiar with it, but have never made it.

    • Reply Elena Paravantes RD October 27, 2014 at 8:55 am

      Thanks Zuzanna! I have a pumpkin recipe posted on the site.

  • Reply Marion October 18, 2014 at 7:11 pm

    Ωραία πίτα και τα κρεμμύδια γλυκαίνουν μαγειρεμένα.
    Και η προσθήκη της φέτα και του ανθότυρου δίνουν ωραία γεύση

    : )

    • Reply Elena Paravantes RD October 27, 2014 at 8:52 am

      Σε ευχαριστώ Μάριον!

  • Reply Rachele November 14, 2014 at 7:58 pm

    Is there a good recipe online for making phylo? These pies all look delicious but I can’t afford the premade stuff.

    • Reply Elena Paravantes RD November 15, 2014 at 9:56 am

      Hi Rachele, The really thin phyllo like the one I recommend here is rarely made at home as it needs to be rolled out to be paper thin, but very often the homemade phyllo is a thicker phyllo that is called horiatiko phyllo (my grandma used to make it). You only use 2 layers: one on top and one on the bottom. I have been experimenting with different recipes and will be posting soon.

  • Reply Rachele November 16, 2014 at 4:41 pm

    Thanks! I live in Montana and it’s wicked expensive here (also we only have one brand and it’s only sold at one store. Yikes!)

    • Reply Elena Paravantes RD November 18, 2014 at 5:37 am

      Ok. There are several places that also deliver. Maybe that might a solution.

  • Reply plasterer bristol May 26, 2015 at 7:09 am

    This sounds lovely. Going to give this a go. thanks for sharing this recipe.

    Simon

  • Reply How to Follow the Mediterranean Diet During Fall and Winter in 10 Simple Steps | Olive Tomato October 12, 2015 at 1:33 pm

    […] 7. Pies Can be a Complete Meal Pies known as pites in Greek, are savory pies made with phyllo and usually a vegetable filling. Pites are ideal to use those winter vegetables. Not only are they fairly easy to make as you can find phyllo almost everywhere plus they last for days and freeze well. These can be a complete meal. Popular winter pies include the famous spanakopita, hortopita (pie with greens), pumpkin pie, leek pie and onion pie. […]

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